Old 12-05-2005, 02:04 PM   #1
Christopher Muller
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Default Heaviest load ever

Since we just talked about the longest train ever, how about the heaviest load ever. If my information is correct, that record has been set again this week. A huge component for a project that will remove oil from sand was delievered to the port of Duluth (Minnesota) and moved by rail to Alberta, Canada. The famous Shnabel car was used to move this impressive load. The train had a top speed of 15mph and encountered a few obstacles on the way. The first being the train was so heavy, it could only move when the ground was frozen. In northern Minnesota, that can be anywhere between October and December. This year, the ground froze pretty good in late November. The train was powered by a single EMDX SD60. Makes one wonder why the BNSF wouldn't want a more impressive looking unit on such a historic train.

The crew of this train was very friendly and waved to the photographers. Believe it or not, there was more than just me in the great frozen tundra.

Click the links below:
HEAVY LOAD

FROSTY LOOKING OUT THE BACK

THE PLAIN POWER

The rear caboose had Christmas lights and decorations on it, including a Frosty the Snowman smiling out the back. I imagine he would rather be inside than the -15F to -20F windchill we had yesterday morning.
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Old 12-05-2005, 02:15 PM   #2
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Cool photos.

Does anybody know how much the load actually weighed?

Whats the capacity of the famous Shnabel car?
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Old 12-05-2005, 10:07 PM   #3
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The hydro cracker reactor itself
weighed 678 tons.

See:

http://wcco.com/local/local_story_328110153.html

http://www.duluthport.com/2005pr/fairlane.html

http://www.longlake.ca/

Quote:
Originally Posted by golden_spike
Cool photos.

Does anybody know how much the load actually weighed?

Whats the capacity of the famous Shnabel car?
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Old 12-06-2005, 04:04 AM   #4
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I know the rails get pressed down when a regular train goes through but I wonder what it looked like with that load.

BNSF probably used the SD60 because they didn't have any other engines available at the time either that or they figured if it had an accident their own engine wouldn't be in danger.

I wonder how that train met other trains along the way with a speed limit of 15mph?
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Old 12-06-2005, 04:53 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BNSF_SD40-2B
the rails get pressed down when a regular train goes through
Is that really true? I've never seen that happen...
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Old 12-06-2005, 05:24 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BNSF_SD40-2B
I wonder how that train met other trains along the way with a speed limit of 15mph?
The Lakes Sub (the track it was running on) is very lightly used with less than a dozen trains per day. The Forks Sub is about the same. The train moved on the weekend, traffic is even lighter on the weekend.
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Old 12-06-2005, 06:51 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BNSF SD40-2B
I wonder what it looked like with that load.
Probably no change from the normal. I counted 18 (Christopher, is this right?) axles on the car. So that's 678 tons spread out over 18 axles which equals to 37.7 tons per axle. A 140 ton car spread out over 4 axles equals 35 tons per axle. I doubt the 2.7 extra tons per axle really made any difference.
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Old 12-06-2005, 12:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmherndon
Probably no change from the normal. I counted 18 (Christopher, is this right?) axles on the car. So that's 678 tons spread out over 18 axles which equals to 37.7 tons per axle. A 140 ton car spread out over 4 axles equals 35 tons per axle. I doubt the 2.7 extra tons per axle really made any difference.
There are actually 18 trucks, 36 axles.
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Old 12-06-2005, 09:17 PM   #9
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In that case, the load is just 18.8 tons per axle. That's slightly more than half the load per axle on a standard 6 axle locomotive. I'd still say that it probably didn't effect the track much.
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Old 12-07-2005, 12:59 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bnsf sammy
Is that really true? I've never seen that happen...
It happens all the time. Look at the tracks up close when a train passes, and you can see the rail going up and down in certain spots.
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Old 12-07-2005, 02:31 AM   #11
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The rail gets forced down as the car's or engine's truck rolls over. When I was little I loved when that happened, I would watch the rails as the train drove over.
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Old 12-07-2005, 02:22 PM   #12
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I know of one spot in Northtown where there is a device resembling a turnout frog that makes a noticable dip when a car passes.

In a video about the BNSF's Orin sub, they showed a device which lubricates the wheels as they pass.

I know this is different.
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Old 12-07-2005, 10:38 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by busyEMT
I know of one spot in Northtown where there is a device resembling a turnout frog that makes a noticable dip when a car passes.

In a video about the BNSF's Orin sub, they showed a device which lubricates the wheels as they pass.

I know this is different.
There's also a solar powered one on the BNSF St. Croix sub, a couple miles from my house.
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Old 12-09-2005, 05:37 AM   #14
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does any model company make that car in HO scale?
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Old 12-09-2005, 04:02 PM   #15
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I have never seen a car like that. Closest would be Walther's 89' Depressed Flat Car.
The longer flat car would be a cool model to make from scratch!
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Old 12-09-2005, 05:07 PM   #16
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The depression of the rail comes from the sheer weight compressing the area between the rail, the tie, and the ballast (lots of space in there...).
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Old 03-17-2006, 09:51 PM   #17
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The depression of the rail comes from the sheer
weight compressing the area between the rail, the tie,
and the ballast, lots of space in there
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

shuda seen the rock island in the late 70's...
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