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Old 07-16-2006, 12:53 AM   #1
Niles
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Default Hello to everyone who doesn't really know what aperture and shutter speeds do

Recently I got a lesson on how to better photos basically by fiddling with different shutter, aperture and ISO settings to get better pictures. I want to share I I learn with everyone else, especially those new to photography.

Shutter Speed: controls how long light enters the camera for. For bright days use a faster time (higher number) and for darker days or nighttime shots use a longer time (lower number).

Aperture: refers to how much light is let into the camera. A small aperture (a higher number) will let less light in and thus is better for bright days. Whereas a large aperture (a lower number) will let more light in and so is better for darker days and nights.

ISO/Film Speed: refers to the sensitivity of the lens. A lower number is better for bright days and a high number for dark days, indoors or nighttime shots.


I hope this helps.
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Old 07-16-2006, 01:10 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Niles
Recently I got a lesson on how to better photos basically by fiddling with different shutter, aperture and ISO settings to get better pictures. I want to share I I learn with everyone else, especially those new to photography.

Shutter Speed: controls how long light enters the camera for. For bright days use a faster time (higher number) and for darker days or nighttime shots use a longer time (lower number).

Aperture: refers to how much light is let into the camera. A small aperture (a higher number) will let less light in and thus is better for bright days. Whereas a large aperture (a lower number) will let more light in and so is better for darker days and nights.

ISO/Film Speed: refers to the sensitivity of the lens. A lower number is better for bright days and a high number for dark days, indoors or nighttime shots.


I hope this helps.
Good advice....

One correction though; ISO refers to the sensitivity of the film or digital sensor, not the lens.
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Old 07-16-2006, 02:07 AM   #3
Mgoldman
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Let me take it a step further.....

Shutter Speed: controls how long light enters the camera for. For bright days use a faster time (higher number) and for darker days or nighttime shots use a longer time (lower number).
If you need to stop action or reduce blur go with a faster shutter speed. If you are shooting an image (without a tripod) using a zoom lens use a faster shutter speed - rule of thumb is 1/(your focal lentgh) - 200 mm 1/200th minimum.

Aperture: refers to how much light is let into the camera. A small aperture (a higher number) will let less light in and thus is better for bright days. Whereas a large aperture (a lower number) will let more light in and so is better for darker days and nights.
A smaller apeture will give you greater depth of feild, in other words, your image both in the foreground and background will be sharper. Consequently, for effect you can use a very wide apeture to blur your foreground and background while keeping your subject sharp.


ISO/Film Speed: refers to the sensitivity of the lens. A lower number is better for bright days and a high number for dark days, indoors or nighttime shots.

Sensitivity of the film, not lens (as mentioned). Why this matters is the more senitive the film, or the higher the ISO /ASA is the more grainy your image may appear, especially if enlarged.

Outside of the creative realm of photography, a photo taken while the sun is at your back will yeild the best results. Keep in mind that this is only possible if you live in California where the Sun spends most of the year.


I hope this helps.
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Old 07-17-2006, 09:34 PM   #4
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I wanted to chime in here. I did not study photography, and by no means am I an expert, but I don't think what was originally posted was entirely correct.

Just because the aperture is open more doesn't mean more light will necessarily create more exposure. The same holds true with having a slower shutter speed. It is the combination of the two that create exposure.

You can still shoot with a wide aperture on sunny days as long as you use a short enough shutter speed to not allow too much light to enter the camera and overexpose the image. The aperture more correctly determines the depth of field.

Regarding shutter speed, yes, you will want to use a faster one bright days, but you should be using a faster one anyway if you want to stop action.

The beauty of photography is that you can use different combinations of shutter speeds and apertures and still get a good exposure with differing depths of field. The term used to describe this is called reciprocity.

Before I get in over my head trying to explain this, here is a link to what Iím talking about. Read on!

http://www.apogeephoto.com/feb2003/Mkees2_2003.shtml
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Old 07-17-2006, 11:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Niles
Shutter Speed: controls how long light enters the camera for. For bright days use a faster time (higher number) and for darker days or nighttime shots use a longer time (lower number).
This is very subjective. Sometimes a photographer wants a bit of blur, so he'll use 1/60th, or wants to stop high speed action, so uses 1/2000th
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niles
Aperture: refers to how much light is let into the camera. A small aperture (a higher number) will let less light in and thus is better for bright days. Whereas a large aperture (a lower number) will let more light in and so is better for darker days and nights.
Apeture is how large the opening at the end of the camera is. The larger, the brighter, and the smaller amount of the picture will be in focus, and more distortion of angle/lines is apparent. The smaller, the sharper (up to a certan point), and darker. I would try to keep the apeture somewhere between f4.5-f9 for most day shots in normal light, brighter for darker situations, and at night if you want to get a longer exposure, stop your lens down to f16 or smaller.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niles
ISO/Film Speed: refers to the sensitivity of the lens. A lower number is better for bright days and a high number for dark days, indoors or nighttime shots.
ISO speed is the SENSITIVITY of the Sensor/Film. A higher number is only good for shooting handhelds in low light. Any other situation you want the lowest number possible, as it will give you sharper pictures.
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Old 07-19-2006, 03:54 AM   #6
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"F8 and be there"!
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