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-   -   Opinions on this one? (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=18453)

StL-rail 09-15-2021 11:03 PM

Opinions on this one?
 
https://www.railpictures.net/viewrej...35&key=2727217

Another case of side lit, with tons of light on the subject, but they're concerned about the nose? Common'

Maybe it's my monitor again, but I'm not seeing lots of noise, maybe a little on the nose area I could clean up.

Thoughts?

Grewup on the CW 09-16-2021 01:28 AM

Looks overexposed on my screen which makes it have the appearance of too much noise/grain. Tone it down and sharpen & lighten the nose just a little and save for next month after its out of the rejection queue.

KevinM 09-16-2021 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grewup on the CW (Post 197913)
Looks overexposed on my screen which makes it have the appearance of too much noise/grain. Tone it down and sharpen & lighten the nose just a little and save for next month after its out of the rejection queue.

Yes indeed. I highly suggest taking a hard look at the monitor you are using to edit these images. As I look at your portfolio, the majority of them are overexposed, and not just slightly. They all have the appearance of being 2/3rds of a stop or more overexposed, but with the highlights crushed. The paint jobs on all of the locomotives look faded. They lack contrast. Quite honestly, without even looking at the photographer names among the accepted shots, I can spot yours instantly because of the consistent, look they all have. Having a unique look is not normally a bad thing for a photographer, but this situation will need to be corrected or you will continue to have trouble with the screeners here. The problem with this shot is that it was either overexposed in the camera, or the exposure was jacked up in post.

What camera settings were used in this image and what changes were made in post?

If you cannot calibrate your current monitor, I suggest seeking out something newer and better. Don't go cheap on a monitor. It is every bit as critical as camera gear when it comes to producing great images. :)

Joseph Cermak 09-16-2021 02:56 PM

I'd also comment on the composition/balance. The train here is vertically centered which I am not a fan of. I would recommend choosing to either add top or add bottom (depending on preference/what you have in frame) to get the train across one of the Rule of Thirds lines.

bigbassloyd 09-17-2021 02:24 PM

Extremely noisy on the nose, due to the attempt to shadow work it into being not so dark.

Loyd L.

RobJor 09-17-2021 07:25 PM

Sorry but not that compelling of an image with a little bit of the road and a little bit of the bridge and faded power.

A&M is a north south route and when they switched the daylight run to the north from a south morning run it eliminated a lot of good locations. Going north is an obvious problem for RPs and south later in the day is going to be a RP's problem. The OP has several nice ones already.

I posted one from 93 r 94 and one from 2007 and called it a day. I had what I thought was a really nice one on a curve with lots of smoke but back lit rejection. So I move on.

Bob

StL-rail 09-17-2021 10:55 PM

I just edit on my laptop, and that's probably most of the problem. Kevin, the original, in my eyes was too dark, not necessarily underexposed, just dark. I probably did overdo the post. This one may not be savable from the original.

RobJor 09-18-2021 12:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StL-rail (Post 197918)
I just edit on my laptop, and that's probably most of the problem. Kevin, the original, in my eyes was too dark, not necessarily underexposed, just dark. I probably did overdo the post. This one may not be savable from the original.

I edit on a laptop(just upgrade) but the angle on the screen on older ones can have a big effect on brightness. I bring up the home page and adjust the screen until things look good. Kevin, don't laugh. But a bigger problem is editing to please the screeners. How far do you want or can go. Jumping thru hoops to hide the shadow on the nose for.....

Bob

KevinM 09-18-2021 12:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StL-rail (Post 197918)
I just edit on my laptop, and that's probably most of the problem. Kevin, the original, in my eyes was too dark, not necessarily underexposed, just dark. I probably did overdo the post. This one may not be savable from the original.

Hi John,

I hope my original post didn't sound too harsh, but it was just obvious to me that the screen you were working from wasn't giving you a realistic view of your edits. Hey, I edited on a 20 year-old Sony Trinitron until a couple of years back and it was only through dumb luck and my religious use of histograms that my stuff was looking reasonable. A while back, I bought a 27" Dell Ultrasharp Monitor and had to learn to calibrate it. Now, when I compare that to the old Sony video tube, I cringe. Even then, I double check everything I post using both my phone and an IPAD. I suggest you try that as well. I find that phones and IPADs tend to make things look just a bit brighter than my calibrated display. If it looks too bright on a phone, I've gone too far. Sometimes, I am tempted to boost exposure by .1-.3 stops because a picture looks a bit dark. The "phone test" sets me straight really quickly. Before I wrote my post a couple days ago, I looked at your recent stuff on my phone just to confirm and yeah, they looked too hot. I think if you adjust the brightness up on your current display, you'll find that you don't need to jack the exposure on your images. You're probably doing just fine in-camera, but the display is making you THINK they are too dark. I also recommend using a histogram for every edit.

As I found out myself, it's not just the camera or lens you carry that creates the nice images. The display you use for editing is a BIG part of the equation.

StL-rail 09-18-2021 11:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinM (Post 197920)
Hi John,

I hope my original post didn't sound too harsh, but it was just obvious to me that the screen you were working from wasn't giving you a realistic view of your edits.-------The display you use for editing is a BIG part of the equation.

You may be onto something here, I often find myself thinking of others uploads, that they seem way dark, or shadows too dark, etc. I've updated/upgraded my laptop before, but obviously never the display. This latest batch of A&M uploads was honestly just going through my older stuff and spotting a few shots that might be good with some editing. Calling something backlit for a darker nose when its a 5/8th's side shot is mainly just a pet peeve.

That being said, you're not harsh, it takes a lot to get under my skin, I do work for CPRail after all LOL!

br_railphotos 09-25-2021 03:05 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Oh, laptop screens - ugh. Well, not all, but many are JUNK. For instance, the cheap Lenovo laptop I have for the random portable computer needs. Horrible screen - heck it only covers 58% of the sRGB color space, according to my screen calibration hardware - but it does the job I need it for.

For my workstation, I use an Asus PA248 24" IPS monitor. IPS, in my opinion, is a must-have for photo editing, as you have a much wider viewing angle. This is important because you don't need to be perfectly square with the part of the screen you are looking at to see proper exposure, contrast and color.

My one complaint with the Asus monitor is the nasty RF hash it puts out. This won't affect everyone, but, as a ham, I find it quite annoying. :lol: Most likely it's due to a cheap switching power supply inside, with no filtering. I really need to investigate, but haven't gotten to that...

Anyway, a good monitor, properly calibrated with calibration hardware, is ideal. A decent one doesn't have to cost an arm and a leg.

The very first thing you can do, however, is to visually check if your screen is clipping dark or light shades of gray. To do this, you'll need to view a stepped grayscale chart and check for clipping. Only the two most extreme bars should look black or white. The others should be a distinct, evenly stepped shade of gray.
Attachment 9920

Regarding the chart, the more bars, the more accurate.

Benjamin


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