Old 03-29-2021, 03:44 PM   #26
RCH022
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OK, I see the angry face on the last post, so I will excuse myself from this discussion. I only come here to be helpful. Just please use caution. Folks do get banned here, and unfortunately, that's generally a permanent deal.
Didn’t mean to use the angry face, which is y I deleted it, Meant to use the sad face and also I put it in the wrong spot, been a while since I’ve used a forum. So sorry if you took that the wrong way. Your info has been incredibly valuable and for someone to take that much time to write all that out in extreme detail is pretty amazing, so THANK YOU. Yes I don’t want to get banned here, I have the utmost respect for this site and the work on here and have for many years, although it can be a frustrating process sometimes haha.

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Old 03-29-2021, 03:57 PM   #27
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I was almost scared this question would come up out of embarrassment, but coming back from a 15 year break from photography I’m working with what I’ve got...As of now All of my editing is done on the iPhone default photo edit app as I do not own a PC at the moment (millennials I know), and as far as i know you can’t do any selective sharpening. And I use an app called “image size” to get it down to RP specs. That picture was taken on the “medium size” setting in the camera, was wondering if changing to small would be better since less of a downsize. As far as a link to the original, no. I could email it to someone I’d they’re that interested.
Quite likely could be a good portion of your problem here - I was afraid of that.

As others have said, resubmitting that photo to RP probably isn't a good idea. I would still like to see the original photo. This would be the only way to tell what the problem is, for certain.

The iPad has a bigger screen, but not necessarily a better screen. You'll be able to see the details far better (ideal), but the color/contrast may not be as accurate, depending on the model. Not that either option will be ideal - they aren't.

If you are to edit on the iPad (or iPhone), I'd suggest using Lightroom Mobile. The app is free for the basic version and $5 a month for premium. The basic version gives the ability to edit JPEGs with an assortment of features, with tunable controls. For instance, sharpening. Premium gives access to local adjustments, healing tools, and RAW editing.

Start with a perfect picture, in perfect light. Sun lower in the sky, no ugly shadows, and no nasty reflections, etc.. Good composition, and an interesting setting (around a curve, taken from a high or low angle, etc.). There are several threads on the subject of various rejections, worthy of checking out. This will give you a good idea what to watch out for.

There are a few things you need to consider/do, especially when editing on a mobile device. First of all, do not have the screen brightness turned up all the way. Properly set screen brightness is a must, whether a desktop computer/laptop or mobile device. For an iPhone/iPad, use about 50% brightness in a reasonably well lit room. Second, learn to use LRM's histogram to check proper exposure and contrast. Third, zoom in: A double tap on the image will usually expand the photo to a 1/1 pixel readout. Not always, which can be frustrating! Viewing zoomed in will be the only way to tell if your image is sharp. The same is true on a computer (Ctrl + 1 in Photoshop, on Windows).

Use LRM's "Export As" feature. This will allow you to choose the correct colorspace (sRGB), quality (100%) and resolution (1200-1600 pixels wide is ideal for RP, landscape orientation). If you can divide the original resolution by a whole number, that's ideal - no "guesswork" interpolation happens during the resize, in this case. Of course, this isn't always possible. Try to stay towards the higher end of the scale (1400-1600 px).

Next, review the exported photo. Zoom in. Does it still look sharp? If not, you might have to import the saved photo and add a bit more sharpening (e.g. 20 sharpening, 0.5 px radius, detail 25). Export with the same settings. Caution: every time a JPEG is re-saved (import-export again), it will loose some data. Do it once, at 100%, and it'll be negligible. Multiple times, however, is a very bad idea! Upload the file somewhere online (such as Dropbox...not Facebook) and triple check that it's sharp.

The best option, however, IS to buy a computer with a decent monitor...As well as a good photo editor. Editing on mobile can be done, but it's, obviously, not your best option.

First, though, check that the camera and lens are working together well, as far as auto focus and lens sharpness, as the others have mentioned.

And, of course, the folks here in the forums are a helpful bunch. If you're unsure about a picture, you could always post here before submitting, to ask for suggestions.

Happy shooting!

Benjamin

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Old 03-29-2021, 04:05 PM   #28
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Thanks Ben, yes you are a helpful bunch, I’m actually overwhelmed haha. Don’t worry I won’t be resubmitting that pic, luckily that spot isn’t too far away and I can easily re shoot that another time. I’ll have to look into Lightroom and from here on out will be using the iPad for anything with RP potential.
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Old 04-23-2021, 02:44 AM   #29
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It wasn't intended as a dig, but I do not understand comments about the screeners with no basis of experience. For the record you did comment in another thread within minutes of a post here, and I should have replied in that thread.
I don't see what is difficult to understand. I was responding in that post you quoted to another person on that thread who expressed a similar point of view - agreeing with him, essentially.

And I do have a basis for experience; I submitted one photo. Call it a "test." I intentionally chose a photo that was "coloring outside the lines" a bit to gauge their response. As expected, it was rejected for reasons that had nothing to do with the quality of the image (the "no light on the nose" bs). I can find a thousand "accepted" photos with "no light on the nose" on this site. So not only is much of what makes up their "rules" stupid and narrow-minded, but the "enforcement" of their "rules" is not consistent. If it is a "rule," the "rule" should have something to do with whether the image is pleasant to look at. If it is a "rule," it should apply to all images; if it is selectively applied, it's not a rule. I wasted no further time trying to please them, nor will I. My contributions are comments and suggestions on photos or in the forums, and that's it.

I never want to, even subconsciously, take photos in a manner that is directed to "pleasing" the type of "gatekeepers" (like the "screeners" on this site) that always seem to prevail in any railfan-centric "media." You know what's telling? When I show my train photos to "non-railfan" audiences, the photos that most often get an "oooh" or "ahhh" are the "backlit" shots with "no light on the nose" - or even (horrors!) backlit going away shots!

Let me tell you what I don't understand - I don't understand why people feel the need to defend the "screeners," when they reject plenty of perfectly good images and accept images that should be rejected.

Based on some of your more recent posts, you seem to be getting frustrated with the nonsense yourself...

You can see my pics here:

https://richardbischoff.smugmug.com/
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Old 04-23-2021, 04:45 AM   #30
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You know what's telling? When I show my train photos to "non-railfan" audiences, the photos that most often get an "oooh" or "ahhh" are the "backlit" shots with "no light on the nose" - or even (horrors!) backlit going away shots!
Backlit going away shots? Hmmm, now that you mentioned it, I’ve been wanting to add this photo, but, technically, it’s “against the recommendations.” Also, some “clutter” hiding the lead unit’s lower portion. Oh well.

Click image for larger version

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ID:	9896

You bring up an interesting point, though. Many times, the images that “barely squeak by” are the ones that get the most interaction/faves.

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Old 04-23-2021, 11:56 AM   #31
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I don't see what is difficult to understand. I was responding in that post you quoted to another person on that thread who expressed a similar point of view - agreeing with him, essentially.

And I do have a basis for experience; I submitted one photo. Call it a "test." I intentionally chose a photo that was "coloring outside the lines" a bit to gauge their response. As expected, it was rejected for reasons that had nothing to do with the quality of the image (the "no light on the nose" bs). I can find a thousand "accepted" photos with "no light on the nose" on this site. So not only is much of what makes up their "rules" stupid and narrow-minded, but the "enforcement" of their "rules" is not consistent. If it is a "rule," the "rule" should have something to do with whether the image is pleasant to look at. If it is a "rule," it should apply to all images; if it is selectively applied, it's not a rule. I wasted no further time trying to please them, nor will I. My contributions are comments and suggestions on photos or in the forums, and that's it.

I never want to, even subconsciously, take photos in a manner that is directed to "pleasing" the type of "gatekeepers" (like the "screeners" on this site) that always seem to prevail in any railfan-centric "media." You know what's telling? When I show my train photos to "non-railfan" audiences, the photos that most often get an "oooh" or "ahhh" are the "backlit" shots with "no light on the nose" - or even (horrors!) backlit going away shots!

Let me tell you what I don't understand - I don't understand why people feel the need to defend the "screeners," when they reject plenty of perfectly good images and accept images that should be rejected.

Based on some of your more recent posts, you seem to be getting frustrated with the nonsense yourself...

You can see my pics here:

https://richardbischoff.smugmug.com/
Wow - you uploaded one image that was intentionally biased to fail. I really don't think that gives you the pass to take drive-by shots at anything involved with the process or people at RP. I am not defending anyone as much as questioning the validity of your remarks.

A good friend who was standing next to me when I took many of the images that I have uploaded here contacted me several years after I started posting here. He and I were very like-minded in our approach to rail photography. It turns out that he was a screener at RP. We never discussed issues with individual photos, especially my own, and I never knew who rejected any of my submittals. I respected his photography, and I believe that the other screeners are/were of the same caliber. Unfortunately, he has since succumbed to a long-term disease, but he did make me sympathetic to the crap that screeners endure. If you go into the process predisposed to the notion that your images couldn't possibly be improved, RP is not for you. It seems to me that the opinion that the screeners are "narrow-minded" comes from a narrow-minded POV.

My current issues are my own, and shared here to make sure that I am not overreacting to a real issue that I am missing. I've received plenty of legitimate rejections over the years, and that kept me from posting flawed images. I have also submitted many images that were "outside the lines", mainly nose lighting issues, with the idea that overall scene or historical context may outweigh the flaw. Sometimes they get accepted, sometimes they go to Flickr. No big deal. Please don't confuse my current frustration with sharing your mindset.
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Old 04-26-2021, 12:19 PM   #32
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If you go into the process predisposed to the notion that your images couldn't possibly be improved, RP is not for you.
This 100%, could not have said it any better. There will certainly be frustrations in the process, but there are certainly a lot of learning opportunities. Going through RP is one of the biggest ways I was able to improve my photography skills when I first started out.
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Old 04-26-2021, 01:45 PM   #33
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If you go into the process predisposed to the notion that your images couldn't possibly be improved, RP is not for you.
This 100%, could not have said it any better. There will certainly be frustrations in the process, but there are certainly a lot of learning opportunities. Going through RP is one of the biggest ways I was able to improve my photography skills when I first started out.
================================================

I agree with this to a point.
1) one can make the argument that an image can always be improved, there is no doubt some of mine were BETTER off afterward, however, many modified were a difference without a distinction.


Here is a night shot at Michigan City, I have others, this one was shot with a longer focal length than I usually do and I posted the way I liked it, a little darker. I made no attempt to resubmit. This is an often shot area but 11th street will shortly torn up. Photo was well received other places.


https://www.railpictures.net/viewrej...25&key=7208335

Bob


For reference a shot a block away recently posted

https://www.railpictures.net/photo/763707/





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Old 04-26-2021, 02:43 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Decapod401 View Post
If you go into the process predisposed to the notion that your images couldn't possibly be improved, RP is not for you.
This 100%, could not have said it any better. There will certainly be frustrations in the process, but there are certainly a lot of learning opportunities. Going through RP is one of the biggest ways I was able to improve my photography skills when I first started out.
================================================

I agree with this to a point.
1) one can make the argument that an image can always be improved, there is no doubt some of mine were BETTER off afterward, however, many modified were a difference without a distinction.


Here is a night shot at Michigan City, I have others, this one was shot with a longer focal length than I usually do and I posted the way I liked it, a little darker. I made no attempt to resubmit. This is an often shot area but 11th street will shortly torn up. Photo was well received other places.


https://www.railpictures.net/viewrej...25&key=7208335

Bob


For reference a shot a block away recently posted

https://www.railpictures.net/photo/763707/
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Bob,

I like your scene, but it is significantly darker than the accepted image. I did a quick edit of levels and cut down the orange saturation for this. I suspect that this may be closer to what the screeners want, but I'm probably a poor reference for insights into what they see or don't see.

Click image for larger version

Name:	2732.1618921729 (1)-1.jpg
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Old 04-26-2021, 05:08 PM   #35
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I agree with this to a point.
1) one can make the argument that an image can always be improved, there is no doubt some of mine were BETTER off afterward, however, many modified were a difference without a distinction.
That's also a good point. I think I was speaking more about when first starting out with RP or with rail photography in general. I think as you learn and develop your style more this may change, but as a beginner, RP offers a different way to evaluate your work.
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Old 04-26-2021, 07:19 PM   #36
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I agree with this to a point.
1) one can make the argument that an image can always be improved, there is no doubt some of mine were BETTER off afterward, however, many modified were a difference without a distinction.
My statement didn't mean each individual image, but does apply to technical flaws that we all miss. The subjective things are, of course, subjective, and I agree that making adjustments may or may not make an image better in the photographer's eyes.

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That's also a good point. I think I was speaking more about when first starting out with RP or with rail photography in general. I think as you learn and develop your style more this may change, but as a beginner, RP offers a different way to evaluate your work.
In your case, Joe, it really has helped you since you arrived here. Your work is markedly better.
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Old 04-26-2021, 07:43 PM   #37
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Deleted, sorry,, probably said enough.

Bob

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Old 05-08-2021, 06:40 PM   #38
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Backlit going away shots? Hmmm, now that you mentioned it, I’ve been wanting to add this photo, but, technically, it’s “against the recommendations.” Also, some “clutter” hiding the lead unit’s lower portion. Oh well.

Attachment 9896

You bring up an interesting point, though. Many times, the images that “barely squeak by” are the ones that get the most interaction/faves.
That's nice. And, ironically better than many "accepted" photos - even some that violate [other] "rules." Might want to lift the shadows a little bit - but don't let that beautiful sky blow out.
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