Old 12-19-2005, 04:08 AM   #1
VirginiaSouthern
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Default UV Filters

Used the search and didn't find anything that tackled this, so I thought I'd ask.

How many of you use UV filters when railfanning and to what degree of sucess have you had with them? Just curious if its worth buying or not.
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Old 12-19-2005, 12:47 PM   #2
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UV filters are common just to protect the lens and cut off the UV light, especially when shooting in an airplane, and in film days I used them a lot, until I started to shoot trains.

When you shoot a train, especially with a telephoto where you are looking at the headlights, you will get ghost images from the filters, no matter what brand you use. I don't use UV filters at all anymore.
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Old 12-19-2005, 12:51 PM   #3
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Roger that. I'm not gonna worry about them then. Thank you sir!
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Old 12-20-2005, 12:09 AM   #4
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Do they help at all to prevent/reduce pilot light and mars light flaring?
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Old 12-20-2005, 12:17 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddavies
UV filters are common just to protect the lens and cut off the UV light, especially when shooting in an airplane, and in film days I used them a lot, until I started to shoot trains.

When you shoot a train, especially with a telephoto where you are looking at the headlights, you will get ghost images from the filters, no matter what brand you use. I don't use UV filters at all anymore.
I too have forsaken the UV filter. While it provided protection to the glass, I had far too many photos with green inverted headlight/ditch light ghosting.
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Old 12-20-2005, 01:10 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthBessemer
Do they help at all to prevent/reduce pilot light and mars light flaring?
They don't prevent anything except physical damage to the outer lens element, and in fact cause most flaring you see. If you have a skylight filter, take it off, and see if the problem goes away.

You can test this by taking head-on pictures of your car with the head lights on.
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Old 12-20-2005, 08:11 PM   #7
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Agreed, i use UV filters or Skylight filters on my lenses. They are essentailly the same thing. They are made for protecting the lense glass. Its nice because IF something was to happen i know that the filter will be damaged and my front element will be ok. It also is good for dust and other stuff from hitting the glass of the lense, insted the filter takes all the abuse. During Daen or dusk and esspaecally night time, the filters will not help anything. They acually make flaring and the 3 inverted light reflections from the ditch lights, worse. I take my filters of during these periods. But i would still buy one. They are cheap insurance. Just a regular Hoya or tiffen filter will do. You dont need multi coated and all that crap, just something to take the abuse.
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Old 12-20-2005, 11:21 PM   #8
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When I invested in a high-end "L" series lens from Canon my trusty camera dealer, who is always trying to sell me more stuff, told me not to use a filter as it would degrade the optical performance of the lens that I was shelling out a lot of money for. I'm now thinking I might try taking the UV filters off my regular lenses, as I have used the filters for protection for years without thinking about what happens to the optics as a result.
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Old 12-21-2005, 10:15 PM   #9
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I dont agree with what your camera dealer suggested. Wouldnt you want to protect you investment. I dont see how it would effect the optical preformance, just as long as you keep the filters clean, and buy good quality ones.
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Old 12-21-2005, 10:44 PM   #10
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Quote:
I dont see how it would effect the optical preformance
Because it's another layer of glass/optics that light has to go through before it gets to the film/sensor...
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