Old 02-23-2007, 08:54 PM   #1
RRBX
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Default Submission of Composite Image

Would a composite image be accepted by the screeners? I did not see anything in the Photo Submission Guidlines about this. Yesterday I caught these four westbound BNSF trains within 45 minutes on BNSF's St. Paul Sub. There is nothing special about any of these trains individually other than they were close together and the sunlight was perfect at this location at this time. Listening to the BNSF East Hump dispatcher gives a clue that closely spaced trains will be coming up the hill when he asks each train "if you don't get the light at Mississippi (Mississippi St.) do you have enough power to start up the hill?". Four consecutive BNSF trains without a CP train in the mix on the BNSF St. Paul Sub. doesn't occur that frequently especially when the sunlight is perfect between 12:00P and 2:00P this time of year. I don't plan to submit them individually. Just curious about this type of image.

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Old 02-23-2007, 09:19 PM   #2
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I don't think so. The individual images are smaller than the required dimensions, the text may interfere, and you would probably have a hard time filling out the photo info.
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Old 02-23-2007, 11:08 PM   #3
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Quote:
I don't plan to submit them individually.
Why not, especially since they're in such sweet light? Bunching them together doesn't make them any more special than having them show up individually.
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Old 02-23-2007, 11:13 PM   #4
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I'd like to see some before and after composite interest shots....
As far as the shot above, sounds more like it belongs under the forums then in the database.

/Mitch
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Old 02-24-2007, 01:15 AM   #5
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I'm working on a lot of "Then and Now" shots, but the format of this web site probably is not the right place to post them.

Here is an example . . . .

Hinton - Then and Now
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Old 02-24-2007, 04:07 AM   #6
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How is that perfect light? Half of the nose is dark.
I'm not trying to be a jerk and I think it's great you saw 4 trains in 45 minutes, but why would anyone else care? It's not breaking any records or anything.
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Old 02-24-2007, 04:31 AM   #7
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It may not be the best lighting conditions, but I'd say they would probably be accepted into the database. RailPictures do seem to publish many sunny, three-quarter wedge photos, and he's got that too! Composite shots like this have thier place, it just isn't here!

I am the first to admit that the screeners have often made me tear hair from my head. But, this is what I point out to other Australians:
- How much do you pay to put your photos on RailPictures?
- How much do you think it would cost to run RailPictures?
... Just thinking about maintaing the PHP Database behind RailPictures gives me a splitting headache!

Chris Kilroy, Chris Starnes, and their team of Screeners can accept whatever photos they want!

As we say here in Queensland, "There's more to life than the Railway!" Somehow, I don't think QR believe that though!
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Old 02-24-2007, 06:28 AM   #8
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there is no way that shot will ever (or should ever) get into the database.
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Old 02-24-2007, 05:39 PM   #9
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I'm not sure what you mean by composite photo, but I would suggest you look through the database and see if there are any shots similiar to what you describe.

There have been a few fine examples of people shooting one train in one spot one hour and then shooting another train on another track without moving the camera. They then put those two shots together so that you get a meet which never really happened. Those shots, while they look cool, do not now appear on RP.


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Old 02-24-2007, 06:37 PM   #10
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I think by composite photo the OP means exactly what he showed, an image consisting of four images of the same location and angle, different trains, each occupying 1/4 of the total viewing area.

Personally, the combination doesn't do much for me. It tells a story of 4 trains at one spot, hardly a significant enough story to justify the unusual photo spread, in my personal view. Even if such a composite were done here, in my view shrinking the images even further to put in a bunch of text makes it worse, especially for a site like this, which is about the image more than the event.

As for perfect sunlight, I think that is a matter of taste, to me these shots have rather boring mid-day light, light I am certainly accustomed to shooting with, but not perfect in any way. Sadly, I am usually unable or unwilling to shake up my life to get myself trackside when the light is truly wonderful. Tradeoffs!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe the Photog
I'm not sure what you mean by composite photo, but I would suggest you look through the database and see if there are any shots similiar to what you describe.

There have been a few fine examples of people shooting one train in one spot one hour and then shooting another train on another track without moving the camera. They then put those two shots together so that you get a meet which never really happened. Those shots, while they look cool, do not now appear on RP.


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Old 02-24-2007, 06:58 PM   #11
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That's two dings now on the lighting in those shots. While not 'perfect' in the sense of everybody will agree, think of it this way: those shots were taken just after noon. No high sun as it's winter and the sun is lower in the sky. It's nice to not have to worry about curtailing your time trackside due to 'bad' light. So, light that lets me stay trackside and take shots without worrying about high sun = perfect light!
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Old 02-24-2007, 08:17 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
So, light that lets me stay trackside and take shots without worrying about high sun = perfect light!
Are you serious?
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Old 02-24-2007, 08:55 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
That's two dings now on the lighting in those shots. While not 'perfect' in the sense of everybody will agree, think of it this way: those shots were taken just after noon. No high sun as it's winter and the sun is lower in the sky. It's nice to not have to worry about curtailing your time trackside due to 'bad' light. So, light that lets me stay trackside and take shots without worrying about high sun = perfect light!
I hope that we can all appreciate that light can be measured in multiple ways, two being its suitability to making excellent photographs, and its suitability to having for a great time trackside along with some well done but nothing special photographs to remember the day with.
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Old 02-24-2007, 09:11 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike B.
Are you serious?
Yeah. Tell me why I'm wrong and you're right.
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Old 02-25-2007, 12:01 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
Yeah. Tell me why I'm wrong and you're right.
Look up the word perfect in a dictionary and then look at the photos that have been posted. Once you have done that, tell me if those trains are in perfect light.
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Old 02-25-2007, 12:11 AM   #16
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I know that I'm going to get shot down here, but ...
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/perfect

Quote:
Originally Posted by dictionary.com
per·fect /adj., n.
Entirely without any flaws, defects, or shortcomings
That's just one of the definitions ...

What do I think is 'perfect light'? When the sun is sitting at 45' to the train so there is even light on the front, side, and top of the train. This way you can photograph the train from various angles and you'll get great results.

Example from Keilor Plains, Victoria:
Image © Michael James
PhotoID: 175797
Photograph © Michael James

Image © Michael James
PhotoID: 175798
Photograph © Michael James

That was a great spot for Local Trains.

I agree that the best time of the year to photograph is Autumn, Winter, and Spring because you don't get the harsh high sun. On a hot, humid, Queensland, summer day, you basically can't photograph from 0900 to 1500 (1000 - 1400 if you're lucky!). It is a right royal pain.
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Old 02-25-2007, 03:24 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike B.
Look up the word perfect in a dictionary and then look at the photos that have been posted. Once you have done that, tell me if those trains are in perfect light.
I never said I was using the dictionary definition of 'perfect.' I thought I stated that clearly when I said to think of 'perfect' in another way. That's why I created and explained my definition of what I consider 'perfect' light to be:
Quote:
So, light that lets me stay trackside and take shots without worrying about high sun = perfect light!
The points Michael brings up are what I'm getting at; in the summer time, high sun leads to harsh light, something that's absent in the winter (and these shots in question). Harsh light is harsh light, and it doesn't make a spit of difference if you're shooting with an EOS 1D mkIII with a $2000 lens on front of it with the best polarizer money can buy, you will not overcome the fact that the light sucks, even with the best of photo editting software waiting at your disposal when you get home...
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Old 02-25-2007, 03:40 AM   #18
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I think in the case of high sun you'd be better off using a Kodak 'Throw Away' that you've purchased from a Vending Machine because the lens is of such poor quality it covers photographic short-comings.

Depending on your position on the globe, you can actually photograph at Midday in Summer. I found this in Victoria. You haven't got a snowflake's chance in hell here in Queenlsland.

I'm looking out the window of my room right now; it's 14:30 and the sun is only just starting to get to an 'acceptable' angle. The shadows extending from the trampoline, garden shed and washing line are an excellent indicator.
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Old 02-25-2007, 08:49 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
I never said I was using the dictionary definition of 'perfect.' I thought I stated that clearly when I said to think of 'perfect' in another way. That's why I created and explained my definition of what I consider 'perfect' light to be:
If you know the light is not perfect, then why would you call it perfect light? I don't understand that at all.
In the lighting conditions that the photos posted were taking in, I would call that acceptable light. I wouldn't shoot any ordinary power in it and I certainly would not call it "perfect light."
IMO.

And I never said anything about high sun so I don't know why you're quoting yourself and backing up your own statement. However, I will agree with you. High sucks and it makes shooting in the summer difficult but I think the green trees and grass make up for it. Regardless of how good the light is, a shot with green in it compared to empty trees and brown grass looks twice as good.

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Old 02-25-2007, 04:20 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike B.
Regardless of how good the light is, a shot with green in it compared to empty trees and brown grass looks twice as good.
I agree, especially if you have ugly black power like NS.
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